Site logo




KBOL: Kitchens, Baths, and Outdoor Living
A natural outgrowth of our design philosophy is a keen understanding of a subset of architectural design we call KBOL: Kitchens, Baths, and Outdoor Living. Kitchens and Baths are arguably the most deceptively complex core components of residential design; outdoor living spaces are arguably the most underutilized concept to maximize a site’s functionality and value potential.


GAW_Highlight Long
The Kitchen as Hub
Kitchens are usually the most technical spaces in any residence, but they also represent the social and entertaining hub of any home. They can be simple and efficient, or specialized to accompany the most discriminating chefs; they can be open and informal, sharing space with other living functions, or formal and functional ordered around a more traditional dining experience. More often, however, kitchens are now a curious mixture of many of these notions, and the challenge to the designer is the ability to create unique and distinct environments while maintaining a sense of openness, informality, functionality, and inter-connectedness.
Stacks Image 5079
DiMaggio Kitchen
Coming Soon
Stacks Image 5088
Three Rivers Kitchen
Coming Soon.
Stacks Image 5097
HLS Kitchen
Coming Soon.



GAW_Highlight Long
Outdoor Space and Functionality
We have found that the traditional notions of "Front Yard," "Back Yard," and "Side Yard," usually lead to missed opportunities to utilize space that, arguably, comprises a majority of the area of a standard residential lot. We prefer to view the space surrounding a building as natural extensions of the functions found immediately within the building—and thus the often under-valued notion of
indoor-outdoor. This notion doesn't merely mean including a window or french door in a perimeter wall—it means activating the exterior, connecting it to the interior, and if done properly, creating an inter-relatedness between interior and exterior. Side yards, in particular (normally, space ignored or otherwise discarded) can be opportunities to connect interior rooms to the outdoors in very private and surprisingly effective ways. We often seek to effectively double the usable area of a design by creating outdoor spaces that duplicate, or combine, with the co-relative interior space—outdoor kitchens, dining, living, and bedroom patios—and at arguably half to one-third the cost of regular construction.
edge
DiMaggio Entry and Landscaping
This outdoor space develops a strong sense of entry between the front driveway and covered porch, while creating four distinct spaces—entry passage, Front Garden, side yard passage and Bedroom Garden, and Entry Courtyard.
Go to DiMaggio Entry...



GAW_Highlight Long
Baths to Retreat and Rejuvinate
Baths were once rooms whose sole purpose was individual personal hygiene. Today, baths often integrate notions common to other spaces (indoor-outdoor, inter-connectedness), are often areas of relaxation and retreat, while still needing to provide privacy and intimacy. They are frequently a space where couples connect and interact, and the act of bathing and showering is often celebrated and open. Many times couples have completely different notions of what makes, and how to use, a bath—and this difference is often what makes these spaces such a unique expression of individual lifestyles.